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Khiry Thin Khartoum Nude Ring

Item# 14157
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$185
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185 USD
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Khiry Thin Khartoum Nude Ring
Description
In his jewelry designs for his brand Khiry, Jameel Mohammed challenges Eurocentric notions of luxury and high fashion by employing the principles of Afrofuturism—the intersection of African diaspora culture with technology. “It’s a means of reexamining my own history and culture, and finding beauty with myself and my people,” says Mohammed, who grew up in Chicago and was encouraged by his parents to explore his African ancestral history. He channels these stories and motifs into his sleek, minimal designs, such as this Thin Nude Ring, which is rendered in the brand’s signature Khartoum silhouette. Intended for everyday wear, the Khiry Thin Khartoum Nude Ring is made in New York City from polished sterling silver and gold vermeil.
Details
  • Designer
    Jameel Mohammed
  • Materials
    Sterling Silver, Gold Vermeil
  • Year of Design
    2020
  • Origin
    USA
  • “My designs are the result of a research process on what the future will look like for Black people, and the world more broadly. The individual pieces are inspired by ideas or icons that stick with me throughout my process.”

  • “The Khartoum motif is inspired by the cattle herded by Sudan’s Dinka tribe. I like to interpret shapes that are present in an African or diasporic context to suggest different versions of luxury. The horn symbolizes the goals of Khiry: the evaluation of Black life and culture in its own context.”

  • “My goal is to relate everyday moments of Black life to the global experiences of both resilient joy and nuanced oppressions. I try to keep abreast of emerging perspectives from artists, thinkers, historians and academics from the diaspora and the African continent.”

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