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  • Boris Charmatz, Modern Dance Series - Paperback in color
  • Boris Charmatz, Modern Dance Series - Paperback in color
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Boris Charmatz, Modern Dance Series - Paperback

Item# 370-900006

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Boris Charmatz, Modern Dance Series - Paperback
Description
Edited by Ana Janevski. With contributions by Gilles Almavi, Jérôme Bel, Cosmin Costinas, Bojana Cvejic, Tim Etchells, Mark Franko, Gabriella Giannochi, Adrian Heathfield, Noémi Solomon, Peter Tolmie, Christophe Wavelet, and Catherine Wood
 
Boris Charmatz is one of the key protagonists in recent revolutions in modern dance. Born in 1973 in Chambéry, France, Charmatz made his first splash as a choreographer in 1993 with the radical duet À bras-le-corps, a co-creation with Dimitri Chamblas. But it was his 2009 “Manifesto for a Dancing Museum” and the founding of the sui generis Musée de la danse in Rennes, France, that shot Charmatz to the center of global discussions on how dance might break through the ossification of its twentieth-century institutions—how dance of the twenty-first century might not simply persist, but thrive.
 
Featuring original essays, an interview, and a complete list of Charmatz’s projects, this book is the first to explore the many facets of his career—as choreographer, writer, dancer, and founding director of the Musée de la danse. 160 pp.; 40 illus.
 
Modern Dance is a series of monographs exploring dance makers in the twenty-first century. Each volume focuses on a single choreographer, presenting a rich collection of newly commissioned texts along with a definitive catalogue of the artist's projects. View the other titles in the series: Ralph Lemon and Sarah Michelson.
Details
  • Size
    6.5w x 9.75"h
  • Year of Design
    2017
  • ISBN
    9781633450066
  • Author
    Ana Janevski
  • Pages
    160
  • Genre
    MoMA Publications

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