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  • Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych in color
  • Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych in color
  • Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych in color
  • Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych in color
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Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych

Item# 15539-157456

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MoMA Exclusive: For this pair of decks, we worked with Harlem native artist Faith Ringgold to reproduce her artwork Woman Freedom Now (1971), which is represented in MoMA’s collection with a maquette that was used to create poster reproductions. The posters were meant to be distributed at public meetings and displayed at spontaneous protests during the early 1970s. The design for the poster is linked to the composition of paintings in Ringgold’s Black Light Series #11: US American Black (1969). 


For
Woman Freedom Now, the colors Ringgold selected—red, black, green—represent Black rights and the Pan-African Flag. The numbers on the artwork, 6/71, indicate the month and year the work was created, June 1971.

Add your own wheels (not included) for a cool, functional skateboard or hang the diptych on your wall as art (wall mount included). Made from 7-ply Canadian maple wood, each board in the Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych measures 31h x 8w x 0.5"d.
  • Designer
    Faith Ringgold
  • Size
    31h x 8w x 0.5"d per deck
  • Materials
    7-ply Canadian Maple Wood
  • Year of Design
    2021
  • Origin
    Canada
  • Age
    Adults
  • Special shipping charge of $22.00
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Faith Ringgold Woman Freedom Now Skateboard Diptych

  • Faith Ringgold

    Born in Harlem, New York City in 1930, Faith Ringgold is an American painter, writer, mixed media sculptor and performance artist. For decades, her work has addressed Black and feminist issues in America. She began painting in the 1950s, producing work that was inspired by the writings of James Baldwin and Amiri Bakara, African art, Impressionism and Cubism. Her 1967 painting American People Series #20: Die, a work in MoMA's collection, confronts race relations in the U.S. in the 1960s by evoking the riots that were then erupting around the country. Ringgold's work has been featured in several MoMA exhibitions, including Around "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon" (2019–2021) and Progressions: A Cultural Legacy (1986).

Authenticity Guarantee

At MoMA Design Store, all of the designs we sell are curator-approved and authentic. We ensure the integrity of our products through research and by working closely with the designers. Our products embody the spirit of good design objects in MoMA's collection. Some of them are actual designs represented in the Museum's collection.

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